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i don't know if it is politically viable. [applause] . . perfect. >> host: steven johnson come in your newest book, in a network age, use those term pre-progressive. what is that? >> guest: it is my attempt to come up with a term for this new political philosophy that i see emerging all around me. the book is really people who are trying to change the world in trying to ban progress, but he don't completely fit the existing models that we have between the left in the right or democrats and republicans. they believe in many ways that the way the internet was built, the way the web was built, the way things that wikipedia were built, using these collaborative. the works, where people come together from different points of view and openly collaborating, building ideas, that that mechanism is a tremendous engine for progress and growth. but it doesn't necessarily involve a government and doesn't necessarily involve capitalism or big corporation. so when you believe in a system come you don't necessarily believe in the traditional anchors that the left are traditional anchors at the
>> the next, author and lecturer steven johnson, bestselling science writer talks about the cyberworld, popular culture in computer networking as a political tool. mr. johnson is the author of eight nonfiction natural history of innovation" and "future perfect: the case of progress in a networked age". >> steven johnson, in your newest book "future perfect: the case of progress in a networked age," you use the term pier progressive. what is that? >> guest: my attempt to come up with a term for this new political philosophy that i see emerging all-around me. the book is a serious story about people trying to change the world and advance progress and who don't complete refit the existing model that we have between the democrats and republicans and they believe in many ways that the way that the internet was built, the way that the web was built and things like wikipedia were built using collaborative peer network for people and coming together and openly collaborating and building ideas, that is the tremendous engine for progress and growth. but it doesn't involve big gove
happened between 1850 and 1861, quick tour. bleeding kansas, kansas-nebraska bill, steven a. doug los, the political compromise of the bill, and it's brilliant. if you want to know why steven a. douglas was known for his political brilliance, read about him in 1850. that's when he became the great steven a. douglas. now, he was forever in slow and rapid after wards because he in effect by promoting the kansas-nebraska act years later, and essentially ofuated what had been achieved in the compromise of 1850. that, too, helped radicalize northerners. the blood in kansas that came out of the kansas-nebraska act helped radicalize northerners. john brown, harper's raid and other abolitionist activity radicalized northerners, and so it would certainly be wrong to suggest the compromise all by itself somehow was all that mattered in that decade. these other things were partly offshoots of it, but, again, war would have come in 1850 without it. hi. >> i was wondering if it's tough to deal with hypotheticals, but if you could comment on compromise would have been different or would have happen
. >>> up next on c-span2, retired justice, john paul stevens, discuss the second amendment and gun laws, and the oral argument with the university of texas, a case challenges affirmative action policies in college admissions p. later, his tore yaps, journalists, and filmmakers mark the 50th anniversary of the cuban missile crisis. >> i watch c-span because when i want to get the news without a lot of talk and pundits adding their point of view, i can get the original script from a person, and then i can come to my own conclusions which i think is better than having someone else tell me what i should think. c-span, c-span2 #, and c-span2. 2 is booktv which i love, and 3 is the history challenge doing a civil war series, but sometimes i want to visit the senate and see what the house is doing, and so i look at c-span for those kinds of things too. >>> sandra parker mitchell watches c-span on verizon. c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >>> tuesday, national journal hosted a&"snumm%=9zez the fiscal cliff, the
to get something done. >> retired supreme court justice jon paul stevens talked monday of the second amendment and gun laws. the third longest serving justice was the author of the 2006 and 2008 dissent on the cases before the court. his remarks at the center to prevent gun violence are in our >> the mass shooting a movie theater just outside of denver colorado in aurora a gunman acting alone in the opening fire. >> [inaudible] just two weeks after the shooting in our rot colorado a gunman opened fire. >> -- aurora colorado a gunman opened fire. >> they called police about a suspicious person and he had been shot in the chest. >> a lot of people can relate to our situation and it breaks their heart just like it breaks mind. at the popular cafe minutes later four people were fatally shot and another wounded as the gun man stands alone he's holding what appears to be a gun. we are going to take you now to chicago where the past weekend at least 52 people were shot, eight of them killed. >> 8-year-old shot selling candy outside her home. >> far from downtown attractions in a weekend of
, in a ceremony ambassador chris stevens cited as the highlight of his time in the country. achieving genuine democracy and broad base growth will be a long and difficult process. we know that from our own history. 235 years after our own revolution we are still working towards that more perfect union. so one should expect setbacks along the way. times when some will surely ask if it was all worth it. but going back to the way things were in december of 2010 isn't just undesirable, it is impossible. this is the context in which we have to view recent events and shape our approach going forward. and let me explain where that leads us. since this is a conference on maghreb that is where i will focus because that is where the arab revolution started and where an international coalition helped stop a dictator from slaughtering his people, and we're just last month we saw such disturbing violence. but let's look at what is actually happening on the ground, especially in light of recent events. we have to as always be clear eyed about the threat of violent extremists them. the year of democratic tr
that there was a beloved local sheriff named steven sorensen had been ambushed at a trailer in a remote town near lancaster in the city where i was visiting mark. it was quite a violent incident according to the early reports and by then it was an hour to after we had heard the first sirens. there were choppers flying around and six or seven different police agencies were converging with the huge and rapidly escalating manhunt. mark turned to me and said this sounds like your kind of story. he was sort of half joking but when joshua trees are involved i'm usually right there. even though i do break for sand and the desert is often the main character i don't respond to every siren i hear and i don't do that kind of reporting even though the story "desert reckoning" and ironically enough. i guess i have with this book. which took eight years by the way. at any rate we started watching the coverage as it unfolded that afternoon and it turned out that the two main characters involved were very compelling to me. there was a dedicated hermit donald cook who was a suspect in the shooting and he had fled after amb
justice john paul stevens this afternoon delivering a speech regarding the second amendment and gun laws. the brady center to prevent gun violence is hosting the event today. during his time on the court, justice stevens authored dissents in the 2006 and 2008 decisions on the second amendment. he served from 1975 to 2010. that makes him the third longest-serving supreme court justice. we expect this to start any moment. this is live coverage on c-span c-span3. c-span2. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> we to want to let everybody know there was a mass shooting at -- [inaudible] [inaudible conversations] a gunman acting -- >> that's when i realized that this is not part -- gunmen are shooting everywhere. >> we go out, and the first thing we see is a 13, 14-year-old with bullets in her leg and her stomach and probably her -- [inaudible conversations] ♪ >> we do want to let everybody know at home there's been a mass shooting at a movie theater just outside denver, colorado, in aurora. a gunman acting alone opening fire -- >> that's when i rea
such a delight to run into steven king, people who love words, love stories, believe. and -- who was done in anthology and volunteer to edit and give a story to an anthology to benefit 826, the dc1. [applause] these are people who care passionately about literature, about words, about freedom of speech and about bringing good stories to everybody. and i think if there's anything that i have ever wanted to do, i have to some degree succeeded and obviously to some degree fallen short of, it is the desire to be able to ride every kind of story that ever was and to write it for everybody. and who really do want it all and then i want to give it to you all, so thank you very much for this. [applause] [applause] >> goodnight. thank you so much for coming. [applause] [applause] "o.o.p.s." is the name of the book, steven frantzich steven frantzich who is oppressor of the u.s. naval academy is the author. what does it stand for? by observing our politicians stumble. i had the book idea but i woke up the middle of the night and said i have to have some sort of a grab on the title and so i tried all
all the justices who sat on the court in the last 30 years except justice stevens had agreed with that point. the question is, is there a compelling enough interest to overcome that first amendment right. so that's the one question and in the second question is how much of that in should be disclosed. we haven't gotten to that very much. >> i think that's a great place for us to go. just a reminder that bradley smith is the cofounder of the center for competitive politics, and a fan of the regular so political money, and melanie sloan is executive director of citizens for responsibility and ethics in washington. melanie, i'm going to turn back to you. i want to get to the disclosure question but also want to approach the question of whether there is a fundamental mismatch between one person one vote and money is free speech. >> i wouldn't agree that money equals speech. i think that they're separate and distinct. i think that there is, a lot of questions about disclosure issues and all the people he used to be all in favor of disclosure in fact are no longer in favor of discl
douglas stepped out and forward dominic john paul stevens to replace them. in his hearing he was not asked a single question about abortion because he was not part of a political dialogue in the way that later became. the big issue, big change began in 198 1980 that goes with the election of ronald reagan ronald reagan brought with them to washington a very underrated figure in a recent american history, somehow i don't think gets his due as an important person. that's edwin meese because edwin meese at first was in flash and then attorney general. said look, there has been a liberal agenda at the supreme court. there needs to be a conservative agenda at the supreme court. what was that agenda? expand executive power and end racial preferences, speed up execution, welcome religion into the public sphere, and above all, reverse roe v. wade and allow states once again to ban abortion. a big part of the reagan revolution was the arrival of washington of a group of young and committed conservative lawyers who wanted to work in that, on behalf of that agenda, who were two of the best and the br
justice john paul stevens discusses the second amendment and gun laws. later the supreme court and fisher v. the university of texas. a case challenging affirmative action policy in college admission. >>> our goal this week is to look at the philosophies of both president obama and governor romney when it comes to tech and communications issues. and to explore any possible policy changes that could result from a second obama administration or a first romney administration. joining us in our discussion is john kneuer. he used to be the administrator of telecommunications under the george w. bush administration and ed paisley is also with us a long time journalist. he's currently vice president for editorial for the center for american progresses action fund. and mr. paisley tbb we could start with you. how would you describe president obama's overall philosophy when it comes to tech and communications issues? >> guest: i would include tech communications in science. i think all three go together. i think it's -- one from the other or two from the other. the overall philosophy is trying to
that their big bad from the beginning, the stuart steven sperry, the chief strategist very in the campaign was that all you had to be was not obama and that turned out to be wrong. you see it in the different channels they are doing now. no, you have to be yourself and not just not obama. >> let me quickly explain because i suspect a lot of you don't know who the stuart stevens is. hatha view were not alive and would know who stuart stevens is. stuart stevens is a republican strategist from mississippi, very interesting guy, at one time was a hollywood producer. all the ambassadors here like him. he also took steroids at one point to see the effect it would have on his ability to do extreme sports. he's a very interesting guy but clearly was first among equals in the romney campaign for a long time, very much espoused his theory of this is an election on the economy and all we have to do is beat the other guy. it's a referendum on obama. there was growing frustration in the campaign as particularly post-nomination, they seem to not work as well and romney seemed to fall further behind. it
intelligence failure, vice president i? >> it was a tragedy, martha appeared chris stevens was one of the best. i can make two commitments to you. one, we will find and bring to justice the men who did this. and secondly, we will get to the bottom of it. wherever the facts lead us, we'll make clear to the american public. whatever mistakes i made will not be made again. when you look in president, martha, it seems to me should look at his most important responsibility. that is caring for the national security of the country in the best ways to look at how he handled the issues of the day. >> congressman ryan. >> weimar in the last of these four americans who were murdered. when you take a look at what has happened in the last few weeks, and they sent the u.n. ambassador got to say that this is because of a protest and youtube video. it took the president two weeks to acknowledge that this is a terrorist attack. he went to the u.n. and in his speech, he said six times he talked about the youtube video. look, if we are hit by terrorists, will call up what it is, a terrorist attack. our ambassado
chris stevens cited as the highlight of his time in the country. achieving genuine democracy and broad-based growth will be a long and difficult process. we know that from our own history. more than 235 years after our own revolution, we are still working toward that more perfect union. so one should expect setbacks along the way, times when some will surely ask if it was all worth it. but going back to the way things were in december 2010 isn't just undesirable, it is impossible. so this is the context in which we have to view recent events and shape our approach going forward. and let me explain where that leads us. now, since this is a conference on the maghreb, that's where i'll focus. because, after all, that's where the arab revolution started and where an international coalition helped stop a dictator from slaughtering his people and where just last month we saw such disturbing violence. but let's look at what's actually happening on the ground. especially in light of recent events. we have to, as always, be clear-eyed about the threat of violent extremism. a year of democratic
reference. hosting our discussion today is.there steven bucci with the homeland security in our douglas and sarah allison center for foreign-policy studies. is focuses cybersecurity as well as defense support to civil authorities. dr. bucci served in america for three decades as an army special forces officer and top pentagon official and commanded the third battalion special forces and became military assistant to defense secretary donald rumsfeld in july 2001 and served throughout the secretary's term and his retirement he continued at the pentagon as deputy assistant secretary of defense for homeland defense and america's security affairs. prior to joining us here he was a lead consultant on cybersecurity. please join me in welcoming my collie, steven bucci. [applause] >> we want to welcome everyone here to heritage this morning. we have a very timely subject to discuss and i think we have a great panel of experts that will be doing the discussing at least to get us started. i have to tell you i have an interest in this because one of the first things i did when i arrived at heritage
southerners, like davis and stevens. then he believed that the, this adamant opposition to territories had done its work with republicans, only elected one of them president. this award, and was chiefly a political matter. he said the united states was never going to read any more territory without republican conference. didn't need to put in place these four model obstacles to settlement. stewart also sought the republican victory in no small part as result of democratic invision. he judged the normal proclivities of american voters as democratic. but as you know in 1860, the democratic party divided. a known candidate and a southern candidate. that division which clearly edited republican. so would've felt, the democrats would reunite and cause republicans massive trouble and less the party could expand. seward want to reach out to the anti-secessionists and the upper importer south. seward bring these people to the republican party was not impossible, but essential. without a question, a number of them were quite willing to become republicans, coming to a party that emphasized the union
, i just someone was saying to me yesterday, i said to them when i was approached by steven spielberg to make the film. i had never heard of him. and they said, how is that possible. and i said, well, it's because i don't live in a life where i know the kl churl icons. and i don't. there are many things i just i don't relate to. so i don't know. >> how incognito can you be? >> i can be very incog tee know. behind these big glasses. are you kidding? >> unless you credit card with your name on it, you're . >> yeah. >> the attitude, you know. if you take the position that you just here. you're just a human being and, you know, all of this stuff that people think about you is their business. it really is. but you have a life, you know, that is satisfying to you. and i'm very much in to my dog. i have a little dog, a little your key, charlie. and honestly he is pretty much -- i do have new books coming out. >> we'll get to those. i want to ask about your most recent, the chicken chronicles. why did you name one of chickening a us in of god? >> i love the name. i decided to call her that. y
, president ford nominated john paul stevens to replace him. in his confirmation hearings, he was not asked a single question about abortion because it was not part of the political dialogue in the way that it later or became. um, the big issue, the big change began in 1980, of course, with the election of ronald reagan because ronald reagan brought with him to washington, um, a very underrated figure in recent american history, someone who i don't think gets his due as an important person, and that's edwin meese. because edwin meese at first as an adviser and then as attorney general said, look, there has been a liberal ayen da at the supreme court -- agenda at the supreme court, there needs to be a conservative agenda at the supreme court. what was that agenda? expand executive power, end racial preferences intended to assist african-americans, speed up execution, welcome religion into the public sphere and, above all, um, reverse roe v. wade and allow states once again to ban abortion. a big part of the reagan revolution, um, was the arrival in washington of a group of young and committe
composed of the novelist joined carol oates in the psychologist steven pinker my colleague and historian simon. this award has always been a major national book price with a hosted outstanding previous winners including among so many others, langston hughes, zora neale hurston and even the reverend dr. martin luther king jr.. and now thanks to the vision, commitment and shared energy of one person, we now have a hot web site and live streaming video of our event, national press coverage and several cavorting lectures and presentations and you know who that one person is. she is the lifeblood of the anisfeld-wolf book awards, my dear friend and comrade mary louise khan. give it up for mary louise. stand up, mary louise. [applause] our annual ceremony has become an important event on cleveland social and intellectual calendar and that takes an entire team of people including ron of course but also cindy schultz. cindy, please stand up in the six other team members who have worked for months to create this evening. give it up for cindy. [applause] as married with louise put it to me just ye
because of people like steven king people who enjoy reading his books, and you have people that like reading about small-town maine but i think maine likes fiction, stories about their state and i think you know they want to read stories about states that are landlocked. i think if i would say anything, there are people who want a good story. you often see people in maine that may be wealthy but they were where flannel shirts and they don't show off their wealth. i think people, if i could say anything about the stories, they want people that are true, not flashy or surely so i can see them relating to this story about a simple people who go about their lives. i think the writers in maine, they take them what they know. i think writers will write about memoirs, families, historical things that have happened in maine whether it's more about the sea and our connection to maine is a great fishing tradition as well so i think mainers are like canadian, they love their sees tories so i think those real stories about our past, joshua chamberlain you know who was courageous during the civil
oates, psychologist steven pinker, my colleague. a historian, simon schama. this has always been a major national book prize with a host of us any previous winners, including among so many others, links to use, zora neale hurston, and the reverend or the king junior. and now, thanks to the vision, committed in sheer energy of one person, we now have a hot website and live streaming video of our event, national press club in several supporting lectures and presentations. you all know that one person is the lifeblood of the anisfield-wolf book awards, my dear friend and comrade, mary louise hunt. give it up for mary louise. stand up, mary louise. [applause] our annual ceremony has become an event in cleveland social intellectual calendar and that takes an entire team of people to pull off, including ron of course, but also sandy shoals. cindy, please stand up in the six other team members who have worked for months to create this evening. give it up to cindy. [applause] as mary louise put it to me just yesterday, and i quote an e-mail, making sure it's going to be here, she e-mailed me thr
and stevens port where his grave is and visit this broken down old mansion that is still there and visited his graff. -- grave its an interesting thing about holt. as much as he loved kentucky and his family and loved his family's values behind when he died he want god back. he did go back. there was some reconciliation after the war with one small branch of the family which happens to be the branch who -- the con temporary people i know and somehow did bring back him back to kentucky. he is right next to where his parents lived and where he was raised. >> in the book you write about him -- one of the review of the book says one of the new thicks you find out is about the perspective on the emancipation in kentucky. >> right. >> what is there that is new on that topic? >> well, i guess actually the border states in general have been pretty much neglected nap is kind of new ground. we keep going over the same old ground in civil war history a lot. >> but is always new ground, if you look around. and the border states have been neglected and the complexity of the border states is something that
stevens, comes on the court case as an appointee of joe ford and is ended still alive. there are a lot of cases going back many years that are not open. but i was more interested in his personal papers, his letters to his children. his letters to his family. his diary entries and the books that he made notes about. all that is just fascinating. thousands upon thousands of files that are out there. >> that is great. several of the justices also had open their papers. one judge kept every note that william rehnquist wrote him. >> guest: the entirety of those notes with no restrictions at all. even though is papers are not supposed to be open, i think, but his papers are very helpful. i was very pleased. i have to thank them for those towel documents. that shows a side of william rehnquist as the papers of him that was very important to reveal. thinking of lewis powell, key and william rehnquist came in in january of 1972. please talk about the role that william rehnquist played in his own selection when it comes to washington. where we left off in our first segment, he becomes an assista
>> we have been talking to steven frantzich and this is his newest book, "o.o.p.s." observing our politicians stumble. this is booktv on c-span. is. [applause] >> thank you david for ringing ancient history. elbow, elbow, wrist, rest, rest. that is the key. that is trivial information and just forget it when you go out the door. at such an honor to be here. having been an actress i am a recovered actress now in my right mind and my left brain but having been there for a long time i appreciate the wednesday morning club and all that they have done to create a first away sis in the desert that is hollywood so thank you for that, david. [applause] we also deeply appreciate all the amazing work that david david and david you are magnificent recently on how the news channels exposing the travesty of the current administration's policy leading up to libya and since then and i want to personally say thank you for being a fierce champion of liberty. thank you. [applause] it's also a great restoration weekend and if you have not been, please get the pamphlet out there. we had the opportuni
more critical and one that was critical not so much the xcom but adlai stevens was written by joel stewart. charles bartlett. >> host: saturday evening post. >> guest: what happened during the 13 day. charles bartlett was a close friend of kennedy and he actually i believe was responsible for introducing jack and jackie so this article came out in one of the items in there was that adlai stevenson had an soft and there was implication that he was willing to appease the soviets and adlai -- >> host: in munich. >> guest: exactly in munich. adlai stevenson was definitely one of the advisers but it was a fairly unfair accusation in the sense that he was not alone in recommending a lot of this so this article comes out which is obscuring adlai stevenson who until that moment had actually had a wonderful presentation in the united nations but the implication comes out then that kennedy has authorized that he is the source of the charles butler article. what you can do now in going back to the salinger thing is we can go back and look at who charlie bartlett talked to in the white house a
. we can look to senators ted stevens who fought world war ii together and representing opposite parties maintained a lifelong friendship. we can look at john mccain, bob kerrey, chuck hegel, john kerry who faced enormous challenges on returning home, took the lead in normalizing relationships with vietnam and helping to heal a wounded nation. it is our responsibility to uphold the legacy of those who have gone before us as we in keeping with the mission of the united states naval academy assume the highest responsibility of command and citizenship and government. thank you very much. [applause] >> we are going to make a quick transition to the front of the room to set up for the q&a by showing a brief video. q the video. we have been having some technical difficulties today. ladies and gentlemen, this video is called action. we encourage you to buy the book and joined the cause. thank you very much. >> our lives changed. we are prepared to serve in uniform but not sure how. responding to our nation's call, in harm's way, in the air, on the ground. >> we share stories of the last
. i thank shelly for her remarks, i thank -- steven -- i want do you elect them because president obama needs some people in congress that are also committed to build a 21st century american middle class and one that lets poor folks work their way in to the middle class. [cheering and applause] you know, it was amazing, i was thinking, i was sitting here trying to contrast in my mind governor romney's account for the 47% of americans that don't pay income taxes, 60% of whom work 40 hours a week and have children in their homes. and until this republican congress and this nominee and this campaign, we had broad bipartisan support from democrats and republicans with a proposition that if you work 40 hours a week and you have children in your house, they ought not to grow up in poverty. [cheering and applause] that's why gerald ford signed the earned income tax credit and ronald reagan said it was the best -- it took over 2 million children out of poverty. that why i started the child tax credit, and when president george w. bush cut the taxes for high income people, at least he doub
stevens was invited to stand for reelection, was convicted, the justice department acknowledged its own errors. not just because of this, but i do want to remind people in the context of this discussion, that there are thousands of people in the justice department and hundreds of prosecutors who do their jobs very well and very girly day in and day out. many things of this nature, those are not the things that we care about. we hear about things when they go wrong. i do think it would be an error to assume that the humans case represents the norm of practice by the justice department. nonetheless, the consequences were serious and it could recur, and love is here to talk to us about what did happen and what might be done to prevent recurrence. >> i think that is great. he took the words out of my mouth. i appreciate what he said that the honor they bring to your job and the good judgment to you and your prosecutors show. i know that david and george comported themselves as well. i'm the one person on this panel that has never been prosecuted prosecutor on this panel. i have been a defen
and i think they succeeded really well. see our next question comes from steven right here in civil -- silver springs maryland in the suburbs. high steven. >> caller: i would like to ask particularly david and julie, someone who is writing his own book on president nixon, i would be very interested to find out what if any advice president eisenhower they have given to president nixon on an informal basis about how to conduct the war in vietnam? >> we talk about it quite extensively in "going home to glory," we discovered an effective cover that in a certain way and i think it was, what happens in late 1967 and attackers is wonderful account the richard nixon wrote that was basically his last business meeting with dwight eisenhower. and what i see here is that by eisenhower was somebody who knew two things and first of all in his era he knew the nature of the soviet communism and he knew america's important than sort of holding up and defending the free world but he also knew that his perspective and his wisdom was generation bound and that the next generation and nixon represented t
mansion in washington that's completely gone, too but i've been to those places and then stevens port where his grave is and visited the broken-down old mansion. there's an interesting thing about holt that as much as he left kentucky and his family values behind, when he died he wanted to go back and there was some reconciliation with some small branch of the family which happens to be the branch whose contemporary people i know and somehow that did bring them back to kentucky where his parents used to live and where he was raised. >> in your book you write about him being dispatched to the west and one of the reviews of the book shows one of the new things you find out is about the perspective on emancipation in kentucky. what is there that's new on that topic? >> the border states in general have been pretty much neglected. that is kind of new ground. the old ground and civil war history there's always new ground and the complexity of the border states is something that's being examined a lot. it can kentucky state in the unit must have been a pro emancipation state. the state in t
any justice participated is still alive. john paul stevens comes on the court as an appointee of gerald ford and is still alive. there are a lot of cases that are not open. the cases from the first few years were. i was more interested in the personal papers with, the letters to his children, the letters to his family. the diaries. the bocks had made notes about. it's fascinating and thousand upon thousands of files that are out there at the hoover institution. >> host: that's great. several of the justice had opened their papers. powell who kept note that william wrote to him. and blackman. >> guest: every note and the entirety of the notes is out there. blackman put no restrictions out. and powell's papers are washington university, his the cure rate of the papers they are technically not supposed to be open. the cure cure raters are helpful . >> of i was very pleased. i have to thank them for those powell documents because that show i william as did the papers of blackman and the papers of douglas showed a side of renner qis that was important. >> host: they both come on th
cases, when any justice who participated is still alive. and, of course, john paul stevens comes on the court as an appointee of gerald ford and is still alive. so there are a lot of cases going all the way back there that are not opened. but the cases from the first few years were. but i was more interested in his personal papers, his letters to his children, his letters to his family, his diaries, the books that he, that he made notes about and all that's just fascinating. and in thousands upon thousands of files that are out there at the hoover institution. >> host: that's great. and several of the justices with whom he served also had opened their papers. >> guest: yes, they had. >> host: powell, who kept every note that william rehnquist wrote to him. >> guest: and so did harry blackman. harry blackman kept every note and the entirety of those notes. blackman put absolutely no restrictions at all. and powell, even though powell's papers are at washington university, the curators of those papers, they're technically not supposed to be open, i think, but the curators of those
until we are 18, steven scully and not work until you are 16 to the it's like there is a map for our lives that has been imposed upon us and the book urges us to think outside of the box and do things in a new way. in other words don't just accept what people tell you and consider different points of view. the title burden for breakfast is a window and urged to think less orthodox. and to attend new things. >> you also talk about the fact that morality in your view doesn't come from the state. one of the examples you use is something increased on your drain. >> i do dampen greece donley drain. that's funny that you mention that. i'm also a big fan of lard. i consume a lot in my biscuits and pancakes and cook all the time so that is another example. it's a good food, i love lard. i love fast food. everybody is down on fast food but i defended in this book. i love mcdonald's and taco bell and i'm crazy for wal-mart. i was watching a movie theater day featuring a century ago i had all these socialists and they were organized and making demands and what they wanted. what do they want? th
. and later retired supreme court justice john paul stevens speaks to a conference about gun laws, gun violence and his dissents in the court's cases involving the second amendment. >> c-span brings a special perspective into what's happening in washington, particularly your coverage of the house and the senate. so if something is going on in the house and the senate -- andw something will go on in the next five years, maybe not this7 year -- c-span covers this authoritatively, very, very well, and it's one of the major news sources or news happenings in washington. we're all struggling with what's going to happen with health care. i mean, c-span was the authoritative voice covering what happened with health care. we're worried about the financial system. c-span, again, is the authoritative voice in terms of what the congress is doing or won't do in terms of the financial system. >> ken gun they are watches c-span on comcast. c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> now, a panel discusses the potential eff
steve heideman. steve stevens or senior advisor for middle east initiatives. he has taught at columbia. he is extensively published, has also directed the center for democracy and civil studies and civil society at georgetown university. he is a terrific asset to the institute. this project is one that is driven by syria with assistance, technical assistance and other kinds of assistance from the institute and sister institution in germany. it is very important that these kinds of efforts be driven by local populations, things that are handed down from the united states that typically don't work all that well and so we are very pleased that you're all here. i hope you have lots of questions and steve if i could turn this over to you. >> thank you very much gem for opening this morning and let me add my welcome. we are delighted to see you while here this morning. it's going to be of very a very very interesting conversation about syria after assad and the challenges of managing a post-assad transition. as jim mentioned, this event this morning is in many ways the culmination of a proje
in a ceremony that ambassador chris stevens cited as the highlight of his time in the country. achieving genuine democracy and broad-based growth will be a bomb and difficult process. we know that from our own history. within 235 years after our own revolution, we are still working toward that more perfect union. so one should expect setbacks along the way, times when some will surely ask if it was all worth it. but going back to the way things were in december 2010 isn't just undesirable, it is impossible. so this is the context in which we have to view of recent events anshaped our approach going forward. and let me explain where that leads us. now, since this is a conference of the maghreb, that is where i will focus because after all that is where the air of revolution started and where international coalitions help stop the dictator from slaughtering many people and where just last month, we saw such disturbing violence. but let's look at what is actually happening on the ground, especially in light of recent events. we have to, as always, the clear-eyed about the threat of violent extremis
that followed followed, tens of thousands of libyans poured into the streets to mourn ambassador stevens. who had been a steadfast two ambien of their revolution. one sign read thugs and killers don't represent benghzi or is lauber out on their own initiative the people over ran extremist bases and insisted that militias disarmed and except the rule of law. that was as inspiring as the site as it we saw in the revolutions. it points to the end dimmed promise of the arabs bring. by starting down the path of democratic politics, libyans and arabs across the region have firmly rejected the extremist argument that violence and death are the only way to reclaim dignity and achieve justice broke in tripoli the country's transitional leaders condemned the attack. they fired the top security officials responsible for benghzi. the government issued the ultimatum to militias across the country. disarm and disband in 48 hours or face the consequences. as many as 10 major armed groups complied. now militias and extremists remain a significant problem in libya. but there is an effort to address that now h
, but circling around and sniffing. the other part of the opinion, and justice stevens wrote the opinion, saying you don't have any right to have illegal drugs, and all a well-trained dog does is sniff out illegal drugs so there's no privacy vision at all. that instruct me at the time, and since then, this seems too simple. i remember the history of the fourth amendment was the, you know, the british were trying to extract taxes from the american colonies. they passed a series of laws that said we're going to put taxes on molasses and sugar and tea, and them because the americans didn't want to pay the taxes, they'd use british troops to break into warehouses, break into trunks, and search, and that's what led to the fourth amendment, the principle of unreasonable searches. i don't think the american colonists would have been satisfied if the british said, we have dogs, they sniff out -- they can sniff molasses and tea. i don't think the american colonists would have said, fine, break into our warehouses. it's an interesting question about what the fourth amendment really means. i think one of t
november. so, question from steven hey who asks, how are you going to work with the opposite party so bills that are needed by the entire country are not held up by partisanship? >> first of all, regardless of who controls the house of representatives, a person committed to serving the community can make an enormous difference in congress, bitten suring that the folkses in our ridge signal offices are responsive and are dedicated and follow up. so regardless of whether the congressman's republican party and john boehner remain in control or democrats take control of the house, i'm committed to ensuring we have the best people in our office responding to the needs of our constituents. in terms of working with the other side of the aisle, the last two years we have seen, getting nothing done in congress, that we will learn from that when we begin a new session in january. from my part, having spent most of my career in nonpartisan public service, not seeing republican or democrat, i believe i have the experience and the temperment to ensure i can reach across the aisle. is a said at the outse
as a threat from london and from other cities around the world. >> steven johnson is our guest sunday taking your calls, e-mails and tweets on in depth. the author will look at sites history, the cyber world, popular culture in computer networking and politics. live at noon eastern on booktv on c-span2. >> this is the first parish church in brunswick maine, and its significance to the story of uncle tom's cabin is that in many ways the story began you. is here in this q., q. number 23, that harriet beecher stowe, by her account, saw a vision of uncle tom being whipped to death. now, uncle tom as you probably know as the title character of the hero of her 1852 novel, uncle tom's cabin. uncle tom's cabin was written very much as a protest novel, by anyone in the north, take a in knowing what all abolitionists lived, if anyone in the north was to aid or abet a fugitive slave, they themselves would be imprisoned or fined for breaking the law. and this was the bill which was seen as kind of the compromise between the north and south to avoid war. so that was part of what the novel was trying to d
activities we have seen recently culminated in the kind of environment like the murder of christopher stevens in benghazi. how do we begin thinking now about strategy and processes for the provision and security in the reform of institutions and for the transformation of a broader culture in syria that has elevated security and the security apparatus to position that supersedes the democratic rule of law, formal institutions and subordinate them to the preferences of those who run the security apparatus. how do we get syria out of that kind of a context and into one in which the security sector functions consistent with the rule of law. these were the challenges that we have to deal with in the future. >> thank you very much, steve. good morning, ladies and gentlemen. not only is this a work in progress as more areas are being liberated and documented, we have a list of suggestion and so we laid out some principles in the reform. the most important of which, i think, is the civilian authority over the army. an army that would be of security services to be able to help themselves politically
that a beloved local sheriff named deputy steven sorenson had been ambushed at a trailer in a relittle burb near lancaster, where i was visiting mark. it was quite a violent incident, according to the early reports, and by then this is just like an hour or two after we heard the first signs. there were choppers flying out and six or seven different police agencies were converging on the scene. it was a building manhunt, and mark said, sounds like your sort of story. but when joshua trees are involved i'm usually right there. i don't -- even though i do break for sand, much of my work is set in the mojave and the desert is often a main character. i don't do fire reporting, even though this story, desert reckoning, is a giant conflagration, ironically i don't do sign reporting but i guess i just have with this book, which took eight years, by the way. at any rate, we started watching the coverage as it unfolded, and turned out that the two main characters involved were very compelling to me. a dedicated her mitt, donald kueck, who was the suspect in the shooting and had fled after ambushing the sh
commentator for abc's good morning america, and paul schott stevens who is the ceo of the investment company institute will team up to discuss the future of retirement in this daunting economic environment they will stick to the current crop of retiring baby boomers and give saving strategies for the younger generation for those golden years far ahead. this will be a new program this is thursday year the commonwealth club in san francisco. tuesday october 2nd former connecticut senator chris dodd will be here in his new role as the chairman and ceo of the motion picture association of america. he will address how last technology has moved entertainment content to the cloud it's created economic challenges to both the industry and government protecting the rights of the 2.2 million cremators and makers in every state especially in california. and then three days later, friday october 5th, massachusetts congressman barney frank will be here for a luncheon program. i should tell you chris dodd is a 6 p.m. program also at the club in san francisco. friday october 5th, barney frank will be here f
yourself. >> steven hank, and i have no affiliation, i'm just retired. come to cato events all the time. i have a question considered outside the box. everything you're all saying sort of assumes that there should be cry criteria of some e administered by the university whether it's academic achievement, and i'd like to throw out to you why the idea that every other service provided in society is divvied up by price, and therefore when the people who most need it, who most need it determine they are willing to pay the price for the best education, and, in fact, a lot of times you have really brilliant people who have no need to go to university, and they are going to get very little out of things, and it may be the weakest student that may get the best, the most out of the education. my question to you is why is this ab sent any discussion what i just said of affirmative action or of education? it's pretty clear that the customers in the situation are really not customers. they are beneficiaries more than they are customers. >> okay. probably that should be directed to alan, the only remai
in libya. this attack resulted in the death of ambassador chris stevens but we also now know that he made multiple attempts to get more security and that these efforts went unheeded. do you believe that the obama administration mishandled the situation even after and also in the aftermath of the attack? what could have been done better and should be done better going forward? hochul: absolutely mishandled, and to learn how that their cries for help from people asking for additional support, and to know they were unanswered is unacceptable. estimate of the house armed service committee when we get back to washington will conduct oversight hearings and make sure that our ambassadors and all the consulate personnel across this globe are protected. we've got to make sure they have within me. i would not do as republican leadership in congress, cut $300 million from embassy security. we need to make sure they have the resources, the protection they need. i do believe there's any explanation other than it was not handled properly and i believe that congress needs to make sure this never happens
participating in the debate. they are democratic state senate majority leader, steven horsford and republican, danny tarkanian. let's begin. mr. tarkanian declined us determine you are up first with your opening statement. tarkanian: thank you for hosting this debating giving the people an opportunity to hear from their candidates. i feel very strongly that these are important for him so that the public can see the differences and the concepts between each of the candidates. in fact i feel this is so important that i've offered to debate my opponent in each of the different counties of which is district represents. as many of you now now know this is a large alt-a diverse district with a lot of different interests and i thought it was important to get out in front of each of those communities and talk about important the important issues that are there. we are going to talk about those issues today. over the past nine months i've traveled throughout this district are going to talk to the people from these communities. we discussed the issues that affect them and the solutions we hope to solve
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